Mr Tom’s Top Blues CDs of 2017

Because 10 just isn’t enough: My top blues and near-blues (that is, old-school R&B/soul and roots rock and roll) albums of last year. I won’t rank them except to let you know that my favorite record of 2017 was a tossup between this Hi-Style Records release by Jake La Botz, loaded with a bunch of tremendous songs, fine singing and playing, and a sound 100% all its own (production by Jimmy Sutton):

Jake

Jake La Botz – Sunnyside

and this outstanding, idiosyncratic, stone cold blues CD from Austin, Texas’s almost-under-the-radar all-star band, The Peacemakers, featuring Mike and Corey Keller, Johnny Bradley, Willie Pipkin, and Greg Izor:

peacemakers22

The Peacemakers

And now, 30 or so other albums you’ll want to have if you dig Real American Music, as it’s sometimes called, in alphabetical (not ranked) order, as they’re pretty much all indispensable, and I am enthusiastic about every one of them. (Cover art follows the list.)

Adrianna Marie & Her Roomful of All-Stars – Kingdom of Swing

Andy T Band feat. Alabama Mike – Double Strike

Chris Armour Quartet – Tele-Porter

B.B. and The Blues Shacks – Reservation Blues

Don Bryant – Don’t Give Up On Love

Rockin’ Johnny Burgin – Neoprene Fedora

The Cash Box Kings – Royal Mint

Chris Cain

Chris Corcoran Band – Blues Guitar Grooves

Robert Cray & Hi Rhythm

Daniel De Vita, Netto Rockfeller, JM Carrasco – Third World Guitars

Eastside Kings

Rick Estrin & The Nightcats – Groovin’ in Greaseland

Billy Flynn – Lonesome Highway

Various Artists of Greaseland – Howlin’ at Greaseland

Casey Hensley featuring Laura Chavez – Live

Egidio “Juke” Ingala & The Jacknives – Switcharoo

Greg Izor and Marco Pandolfi – Homemade Wine

Nathan James – What I Believe

Marquise Knox – Black and Blue

Miss Freddye – Lady of the Blues

Konstantin Kolesnichenko – Minor Differences

Martin Lang – Ain’t No Notion

The Love Light Orchestra featuring John Németh – Live from Bar DKDC in Memphis, TN!

Bia Marchese – Love Me Right

The Paladins – New World

John Primer & Bob Corritore – Ain’t Nothing You Can Do

Laura Rain & The Caesars – Walk With Me

Patrick Recob – Perpetual Luau

Chris Ruest & Gene Taylor – It’s Too Late Now

The Red Devils – Return of the Red Devils

San Pedro Slim – In Times Like These

Joakim Tinderholt – Hold On

Jimmie Vaughan Trio featuring Mike Flanigin – Live at C-Boy’s

Wee Willie Walker & The Anthony Paule Soul Orchestra – After A While

Monster Mike Welch & Mike Ledbetter – Right Place, Right Time

Peter Ward – Blues On My Shoulders

Kim Wilson – Blues & Boogie Vol 1

Oscar Wilson – One Room Blues

 

Adrianna Marie

Andy T

Chris Armour Quartet - Tele-Porter - cover

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Don Bryant

Rockin Johnny

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CBK

Corcoran

CrayPassport

Eastside

Estrin

Billy

Casey H

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What I Believe

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LLO

Bia

Paladins

Primer

LRC

Recob

Ruest Taylor

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sps

Tinderholt

Howlin'

 

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WWW

Ward

Welch

Wilson Kim

Wilson Oscar

 

 

 

 

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Nuestro Camino

dupree lp 05 outside

Dupree

Nuestro Camino

Public Hi-Fi Records, 2013

http://mikeflanigin.com/mikeflanigin/Dupree.html

http://www.public-hifi.com/

Nuestro Camino was made the old fashioned way. A few players, well acquainted with and sympathetic to each other, got together in a good-sounding room to run through a set of songs, and a talented producer/engineer got the results down, in real time, on tape. Certain details were, of course, changed. The session did not take place in Rudy Van Gelder’s New Jersey living room; instead, Jim Eno captured the sounds at his Public Hi-Fi Studio in Austin, Texas. The modern day Ben Dixon is drummer Kyle Thompson. In lieu of Baby Face Willette or John Patton, we hear Mike Flanigin, a Hammond organ maestro who regularly plays blues with Jimmie Vaughan at the Continental Club, and lays down serious funk behind Mike Barfield.  Rather than Grant Green, Jake Langley–whose versatility has been shown through his work  with artists as diverse as Pinetop Perkins and Cindy Cashdollar, and in his five years touring with Joey DeFrancesco–is on guitar.

Their band is called Dupree, and the music they make, refreshingly free of environmental contaminants and artificial additives formulated by modern science, is organ trio jazz in the best tradition: heavy on soul and standards; lowdown, yet often elegant; and clearly intended to move the body and spirit at least as much as the mind. Nuestro Camino is, quite simply, superb. Six songs make up the core of the album (more about that later). Greasy and propulsive, Flanigin’s “The Turtle” recreates the blue beat sound of vintage soul jazz. Thompson’s impossibly syncopated groove underpins the proceedings; Langley blends funky chording and Green-inspired single notes; and Flanigin builds tension mercilessly in his solo. The smoky blues “Malibu Classic” runs cooler, the B3 adding stabs and swells in the background as the guitar outlines the head and takes the first few lead choruses, mixing octaves, burbling note combinations, and fluid lines. Flanigin’s organ solo is full of hip rhythmic displacements and winding phrases.

Cooler yet is the moody, minor lope “All Or Nothing At All.” Thompson drops bombs throughout, giving the standard a rolling feel that sets the table for Langley’s fleet lines and some beautiful work from Flanigin, who dials in a series of fantastic tones as he plays around the melody. In the invigorating “KC,” Flanigin holds a pedal note beneath increasingly insistent lead lines to great effect; his overdriven tone is sure to induce ecstacy in B3 fanciers. Thompson’s part is hard R&B, just a funky, displaced beat away from Motown’s signature four-to-the-bar snare hits. The swinging “Leon’s Thing” motors along nicely, Flanigin’s trebly, hollow tone balancing Langley’s rounder sound. A vaguely flamenco-flavored guitar introduction eases the trio into the exotic “Moto Guzzi,” a sultry piece that evokes palm trees and tropical breezes, splitting the difference between Latin and tiki sounds.

Four bonus tracks round out the set. Langley submits “Nightcap,” a mellow, swaying meditation. Tina Brooks’s “David The King” and Horace Silver’s “Cookin’ At The Continental” shift the focus slightly, letting Dupree work out in hard bop settings. They excel here, too, playing with imagination and intensity while maintaining a solidly bluesy feel. The album’s surprise pick hit, taking a page from later developments in soul jazz, when pop tunes provided new launch pads, is the Bacharach-David composition “Close To You,” originally made famous by The Carpenters, here taken to church with beautiful tones and a subtle approach.

I began this piece by pointing out the project’s throwback vibe. Probably nothing illustrates that more clearly than the fact that the CD edition was actually an afterthought. The bonus tracks, included on the CD, are available as downloads to those who purchase the LP or 8-track versions of Dupree’s album. Yes, you read that correctly: the recording is available on 8-track tape. In any format the listener chooses, Nuestro Camino is wildly successful at extending the organ trio tradition. The album feels great and sounds incredible; its music is perfect for driving, for dim-light chilling, or for intensive listening. Dupree has it going on in every department: creativity, chops, groove, dynamics, tone, and songs. Highest recommendation.

TOM HYSLOP

I purchased this CD from Public Hi-Fi’s Web site.