Will Porter, Tick Tock Tick

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Will Porter

Tick Tock Tick

Gramofono Sound (U.S.), dist. Kent Records (U.K.)

This superb album is too good to remain under wraps. My full-length review will appear soon in Blues Music Magazine. Here is a preview.

 

Will Porter’s singing is so natural as to make his considerable technique transparent, even invisible. Leveraging valuable contributions from Dr. John, the Womack Brothers, Bettye LaVette, and others, and making the most of producer Wardell Quezergue’s arrangements, Tick Tock Tick catches our attention with swaggering soul and jagged funk, and draws us in with thoughtful blues and lush, quietly devastating ballads. This is timeless stuff, the perfect restorative for listeners out of patience with an endless stream of showy but ultimately shallow music. Porter has made a record full of soul and heart that grown-up human beings will respond to and love.

 

 

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Kenny Parker • Yes Indeed!

Yes Indeed!

Kenny Parker

Yes Indeed!

Blue Angel Recordings, 2013

https://myspace.com/kennyparkerblues

Download Yes Indeed! at iTunes, CDBaby, and Amazon. To buy CDs, contact the artist via Facebook or email (kennykool25 AT hotmail.com), or go to one of his shows.

 

It is hard to believe that almost 20 years have gone by since the release of Raise The Dead. Kenny Parker’s first album featured performances by some of the finest musicians in Detroit and beyond–players like The Butler Twins, Bill Heid, and Darrell Nulisch­–unified by his fiery yet tasteful guitar work, and stands up today as an solid sampling of straight-ahead blues. While the contemporary scene in Detroit (and elsewhere) is vastly different, Parker continues to keep high standards and good company. His new project Yes Indeed!, which features the vocals and harp of Garfield Angove, with Chris Codish and Tim Brockett on keys, Renell Gonzalves on drums, and Bob Connor and Mike Marshall (a returning collaborator) on bass, delivers a range of exciting music.

Parker’s varied originals make up the bulk of the record. Wailing harmonica and a humorous, spoken narrative about a high maintenance woman, delivered through a harp mike by The Reverend Lowdown, are essential components of “Wig Hat,” a lowdown stomp akin to an early Howlin’ Wolf number, with a guitar break as spiky as barbed wire. “I’m Gonna Make You Mine,” a shuffle with 1950s Memphis written all over it, features vivid lyrics and a raw, enthusiastic performance. A Texas feeling, reminiscent of Frankie Lee Sims by way of Mike Morgan & The Crawl, informs a pair of shuffles in the middle of the set: The tough swagger of “Shake That Thing” would have suited Parker’s old employers The Butler Twins well, while on “Spellbound” (co-written with Woodstock Sally Scribner), Parker breaks out his slide. Most slide guitarists playing blues (not rock) draw heavily on Muddy Waters or Elmore James; Parker’s curling, languid lines are original, with a hint of Smokin’ Joe Kubek’s style.

“Look Before You Leap,” a Parker-Angove collaboration, has a melody akin to Kim Wilson’s “Don’t Bite The Hand That Feeds You.” The song bears the merest suggestion of a rocking J.B. Lenoir shuffle and jumps as hard as Little Walter, but rather than aping Lockwood/Tucker or Louis Myers, Parker’s slashing attack is all Guitar Slim. It’s an unexpected and effective juxtaposition. Gonzalves’s invention and swing behind “Leap” are likewise impressive. “Tight Black Sweater” is about as modern as this set gets. Its hard-hitting “Tramp” groove features a slick Leslie sound on the guitar, a fine organ solo, and a spoken vocal right out of the textbooks written by Lowell Fulson and Otis & Carla. Angove’s harp accents lend a down home, “Scratch My Back” edge.

The playlist includes four covers. On Greg Piccolo’s title track, which opens the disc, the band lays down a clipped, upbeat shuffle, warmed by a sunny vocal and the horn section of Larry Lamb (sax) and Andy Wickstrom (trumpet). Paced by Parker’s uncluttered, melodic solo, “Yes Indeed” swings like a Ronnie Earl-era Roomful Of Blues tune should. Angove provides impressive, swooping harp lines and big tone on a muted, somber reading of Little Walter’s “Can’t Hold Out.” Parker turns in a fierce and faithful version of Gatemouth Brown’s classic “Okie Dokie Stomp” and salutes Ike Turner with a cover of the exotic “Cuban Getaway” that is sweet and snarling; the piano break nods, appropriately, to Professor Longhair’s rolling, complex, Carribean-inflected style. A serene take on the familiar show tune “You’ll Never Walk Alone” closes the disc on a quiet note, with a piano picking out the chords note by note the only backing for Parker’s gently soaring slide guitar.

If I were pressed to recommend a single track, it would be “Valentine’s Day,” a spare, funereally paced minor blues that shows how powerful restraint can be in the right hands. Parker’s playing is quiet and purposeful, and absolutely without the ulterior motive of turning it up to 10 and stepping on the gas halfway through the song. His outstanding performance is built on clean lines, rolling trills, ‘60s-era Buddy Guy double-stops, Otis Rush-leaning bends, and, above all, dynamics. Bravo! The devastating lyrics match the tone of the music, Angove’s subdued vocal delivery packs a heavy wallop, and for a sublime 5:49, everything hangs on beautiful and ominous piano accompaniment worthy of Otis Spann. Such combinations make Yes Indeed! a classy and memorable collection of pure blues.

 

TOM HYSLOP

 

The artist kindly provided the CD for this review.

The Nick Moss Band • Time Ain’t Free: Preview

Nick Moss Band

The Nick Moss Band

Time Ain’t Free

Blue Bella Records, 2014

http://www.nickmoss.com/

http://www.bluebellarecords.com/

I saw the Nick Moss Band perform twice in 2013 and was left with an extremely favorable impression. Even so, I was unprepared for what I heard when Nick asked me to listen to the band’s upcoming record, due in March. Killer piano and organ sounds balance excellent, varied guitar tones, all riding atop a powerful, nuanced rhythm section. Nick’s husky vocals are matched by those of the new band member, Michael Ledbetter, an exceptional soul and blues (and, I understand, opera) singer, making a potent one-two combination.

Time Ain’t Free finds an inspired Nick Moss extending his creative streak, offering an intelligent, updated take on ‘70s rock and R&B, marked by daring arrangements and surprising juxtapositions. Blending elements of Parliament, the Allman Brothers, Stevie Wonder, Faces, even Afrobeat, and at times evoking an Ike Turner-Little Feat summit, the set encompasses Muscle Shoals sweetness, stormy postmodern boogie, greasy roadhouse R&B, soul-tinged rock, and gospel-inflected ballads, all filtered through Moss’s deep-blue lens, rocking hard yet stone funky.

Look for Time Ain’t Free to be one of 2014’s more interesting releases – complex and challenging, but tuneful and completely accessible.

The Chris Ruest Band – Live at Shakespeare’s

flyerShakespeare

Chris Ruest Band

Live at The Shakespeare Pub • Houston, Texas

2013

http://www.chrisruest.com/

If you haven’t been paying attention to his career, this is the short version of what you need to know: Chris Ruest is the real thing. The New Englander has been a resident of Texas for well over a decade. Already a serious student and lover of traditional blues and blues-oriented jazz artists, the singer-guitarist came up through Brian “Hash Brown” Calway’s band (justly regarded as the finishing school of choice for aspiring Dallas blues musicians), and has worked with many of the Lone Star State’s most important talents, including the great Ray Sharpe (“Linda Lu”). Ruest cut his third CD, Live at Shakespeare’s, in March of this year, with JD Ditullio on drums, and the great Ronnie James (Nightcats, Fabulous Thunderbirds, Jimmie Vaughan, Nick Moss) on bass.

This brand new album revisits only a few selections from Ruest’s previous releases, 2005’s Too Many Problems and 2011’s No 2nd Chances (both excellent sets, recorded with all-star bands and loaded with well-written original tunes), but those provide an overview of his stylistic range. “Poor Lil’ Greta,” Chris’s apologetic ode to a deceased pet, spotlights slide guitar and a deep blues groove, both unmistakably cut from Muddy Waters’s slow blues template. “My Baby Loves Me,” with its swaggering shuffle and slashing slide guitar figure, is firmly in the tradition of Elmore James. And “You Suck” lulls us into thinking it is a garden-variety you’re-mistreating-me song, until Ruest sings the laugh-out-loud funny chorus. James and Ditullio lay down a quirky, throwback R&B groove a mile wide, reminiscent of “I’m Shakin’.”

The balance of the playlist expands on these elements with intelligently selected covers that give insight into, and pay tribute to, some of Ruest’s favorite artists. He dials up the reverb for a harrowing take on Magic Sam’s fabulous (and rarely covered) “Out of Bad Luck,” replete with a blistering guitar break, and ratchets up the rumba feel behind an update of Arthur Crudup’s “Mean Ole Frisco,” filtered through B.B. King’s version, with lead guitar that nails King’s ’50s style. There’s a strong take on Muddy’s “Champagne and Reefer,” a hard-shuffling adaptation of Lonesome Sundown’s swamp classic “Don’t Say A Word,” and two of Elmore’s greatest songs: a bristling romp through “Cry For Me” and a greasy reading of the stop-time Latin-influenced “Can’t Stop Loving My Baby.” I know “Bark” best from the Darrell Nulisch-era Anson Funderburgh & The Rockets; the band deftly handles this loping shuffle.

What do Elmore James and The Rockets have in common? Why, Sam Myers, of course. The harmonica great was a bluesman in the truest sense of that now-debased word, and perhaps the strongest influence felt by Ruest, who acted as the legend’s right-hand-man during the last three years of Sam’s life. Ruest pays tribute to his close friend by singing Sam’s “Sad Lonesome Day,” adorning the slow blues with elegant guitar lines à la King and Funderburgh, and his vintage gem “Sleepin’ in the Ground,” which presents Ruest’s guitar playing at its meanest, dirtiest, and most low-down.

The presence of the proto-punk nugget “Strychnine” reflects the influence of another of Ruest’s closest friends. The late, great Nick Curran was a fearless free spirit who was apt to follow a T-Bone Walker chestnut with a selection from the catalog of The Stooges, or to pair a Little Richard song with an AC/DC number. Viewed in that light, the seemingly improbable inclusion of The Sonics’ wild ’60s rocker makes perfect sense. Two excellent instrumentals, one by Albert Collins (“The Freeze”), the other from Ike Turner (“Cuban Getaway”) bracket the set. Ruest politely converts a mid-show request for something by Stevie Ray Vaughan into a teaching opportunity, instead performing yet another iconic instrumental: a stinging version of Freddie King’s “Funnybone.”

Like the rest of the program, these three songs let the band work out on touchstone tunes that still sound fresh, owing to their relative scarcity in the playlists of contemporary bands, and demonstrate Ruest’s control of the essential themes of real blues guitar. His playing, sometimes deliberate, frequently savage, is always intense, carrying the threat of violence that was imminent in the approach of Curran, or Pat Hare. Paired with this outstanding rhythm section, Ruest–one of the toughest players anywhere–is on fire. Live at Shakespeare‘s is his master class in blues history, vividly performed, and should attract a great of overdue attention.

TOM HYSLOP

The artist kindly provided the CD for this review.